Stella’s work gives special attention to matter by avoiding binary understandings such as mind-body or physical-digital. Through film, video performance and sculpture, Stella explores an awareness that materializes in the space between an event and a perceiver. 



Stella is interested in subverting the dominance of the visual by asking how video can come into existence through the senses and embodied experience. Stella is drawn to the potential of storytelling as a tool for regenerative creation. 
 



Through film, video performance and sculpture, Stella explores an awareness that materializes in the space between an event and a perceiver.



Drawn to the potential of storytelling as a tool for regenerative creation. 


Video Installation
22 min video loop, hanging glass sculptures, azolla fern, sand, fog difusers. 

Concept, camera, editing, glass sculptures: Stella Horta 

Performers: Natasha Virgilio, Rachel Bo, Emeka Ene, Deva Schubert
Composition: Tom Lönqvist, Usof



azolla allegory




ꕀ 
ꕀ ꕀ
ꕀ ꕀ Interactions between organisms and environments generated bodies. 
ꕀ ꕀ

ꕀ  ꕀ  
ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ Events cascaded out of a single symbiotic encounter. 
ꕀ ꕀ
ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ
ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ  
ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ
ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ

ꕀ Arctic sediments hold memories as our feet sink slowly into warm water. 

ꕀ ꕀ








Azolla Allegory makes use of the visual metaphor of a freshwater fern and its symbiotic relationship with a blue-green cyanobacteria. This cyanobacteria has imprinted its genetic essence upon this fern, resulting in cascade of events during the Eocene era. Traces of this event are visible in ancient Arctic sediments. Azolla Allegory proposes to make visible the complex web of agencies and dynamic interactions between organisms and environments that over time become bodies.





What if we could perceive our environments as active generators of life forms, rather than
passive settings for life to exist? 




























Video Installation 22 min video loop, hanging glass sculptures, azolla fern, sand, fog difusers.


Concept, camera, editing, glass sculptures: Stella Horta
Performers: Natasha Virgilio, Rachel Bo, Emeka Ene, Deva Schubert
Outside eye: Judith Förster
Sound composition: Tom Lönqvist, Usof, Stella Horta
Costumes: Iva Hoes, Stella Horta
Pillows: Jona Carstensen



Interactions between organisms and environments generated bodies.
ꕀ ꕀ

ꕀ  ꕀ  
ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ Events cascaded out of a single symbiotic encounter. 
ꕀ ꕀ
ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ
ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ  
ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ
ꕀ ꕀ ꕀ

ꕀ Arctic sediments hold memories as our feet sink slowly into warm water. 








Azolla Allegory makes use of the visual metaphor of a freshwater fern and its symbiotic relationship with a blue-green cyanobacteria. This cyanobacteria has imprinted its genetic essence upon this fern, resulting in cascade of events during the Eocene era. Traces of this event are visible in ancient Arctic sediments. Azolla Allegory proposes to make visible the complex web of agencies and dynamic interactions between organisms and environments that over time become bodies.





























Video Sculpture
Two video sculptures created for Judith Förster's piece “Horizon Problems” premiered in November 2022 at Sophiensaele, Berlin.
Documentation: Ryan Molnar

anarres and urras









The two video sculptures Anarres and Urras, named after the two planets in Ursula Le Guin's novel “Dispossessed”, blur the borders of matter and tech. They become multidimensional hybrids, playing with the idea of new materialities themselves: interweaving light, video, and 3D animation in dialogue with the performance that is happening live.
The haptic and creature-like dimensions of the sculptures are a development of an expanded understanding of video that Stella has been developing through close collaboration with dance/performance.





















After showdown AV and Handle With Care, Horizon Problems is the third work by Judith Förster, in which Stella Horta collaborates by bringing the audiovisual dimension into Judith Förster´s choreographic work. Through this collaboration, they further develop research in science fiction narratives to pursue a physical-emotional approach to coexistence and belonging in a complex society.




















































anarres and urras


Video Sculpture
Two video sculptures created for Judith Förster's piece “Horizon Problems” premiered in November 2022 at Sophiensaele, Berlin.
Documentation: Ryan Molnar





The two video sculptures Anarres and Urras, named after the two planets in Ursula Le Guin's novel “Dispossessed”, become multidimensional hybrids, playing with the idea of new materialities themselves: interweaving light, video, and 3D animation in dialogue with the performance that is happening live.



The haptic and creature-like dimensions of the sculptures are a development of an expanded understanding of video that Stella has been developing through close collaboration with dance/performance.
















After showdown AV and Handle With Care, Horizon Problems is the third work by Judith Förster, in which Stella Horta collaborates by bringing the audiovisual dimension into Judith Förster´s choreographic work.

















Short Film
A short film portraying the embryonic development of a Zebrafish.
Solarfish explores themes such as more-than-human relations, model animals, the performance of a researcher, and the possibility or impossibility to tune into a more-than-human perspective.

Directing, Cinematography, and Editing: Stella Horta
Text: Stella Horta and Denise Pereira
Acting: Eva Fishan
Sound: Tom Lönnqvist

solarfish















Solarafish short film was exhibited within the frame of “Another Matter” at Acud Gallery.

“The exhibition Another Matter explored new ways of relating to the more-than-human and inquires into the social, material, and aesthetic conditions of the so-called Anthropocene. The exhibition is developed by the UdK Experimental Film and Media Art Class with the curatorial support of Vanina Saracino.”



Short Film


A short film portraying the embryonic development of a Zebrafish.




























“Imagine if we could highlight the highs and lows of our life with fluorescence. A map to keep as a souvenir. We could pin it to our fridge or use it as a social media picture.” -video quote




“Sometimes numbers have the power to make life feel organized and sweet. The Zebrafish has more than 26,000 protein-coding genes. When I think of such a number I feel safe and at the same time confused.” -video quote








Microscopic imagery of the Zebrafish development.










Sometimes numbers have the power to make life feel organized and sweet. The Zebrafish has more than 26,000 protein-coding genes. When I think of such a number I feel safe and at the same time confused.























Video Performance
Directing, cinematography, editing, and photography based on Judith Föster’s Choreographic installation.
Premiered at feldfünf and shown at Hackesche Höfe Kino in cooperation with Sophiensaele.

handle with care








“Would you come over? My world is whirled by stormy weather. The horizon leans constantly forward and I’ve lost order so time spits. My hands are empty. All around me and all around you are numbers of people constantly balancing things, fixing things, breaking things, humans-in-the-loop.” - Isabel Gatzke












































“After showdown AV, Handle With Care is the second work by choreographer Judith Förster to premiere as a video avatar through a collaboration with filmmaker Stella Horta. The physical space on which it is based is shaped by the movements of the dancers Hannah Krebs and Sunayana Shetty as well as objects by Martin Sieweke and André Uerba, texts by Isabel Gatzke, and sounds by Fjóla Gautadóttir.”


















handle with care 




Video Performance
Directing, cinematography, editing,  photography.
 
















Judith Förster to premiere as a video avatar through a collaboration with filmmaker Stella Horta. The physical space on which it is based is shaped by the movements of the dancers Hannah Krebs and Sunayana Shetty as well as objects by Martin Sieweke and André Uerba, texts by Isabel Gatzke, and sounds by Fjóla Gautadóttir.








Video Performance/ Cinematic Avatar
Directing, cinematography, and editing of video performance.

Within the festival Tanztage the work was shown as performance by Judith Förster and Nanna Stigsdatter as well as a film by Stella Horta. Inspired by Monique Wittig's Le Corps Lesbien and Octavia Butler's novel Parable of the Sower, showdown AV episodically presents the encounter and coexistence of two individuals.

showdown AV
































paragliding /
                  knotting / 
                                   masking /
              waterfall /













“Do you remember those motionless moments in film where everyone points a weapon at each other ready to shoot? The only way to get out of this situation without the risk of being killed is a slow and careful withdrawal, like slowly getting the air out of a balloon, very slowly.” - film quote




                                                              



























“I watch her struggling in your arms, I hear her call for m/y help, I roll against her to try to grasp her arms, shoulders or legs. Finally, she bursts out laughing, her muscles relax, she asks for her bandage to be removed, so she may see where she is. Night falls. One can hear the sea.”


showdown AV



Video Performance
Directing, cinematography, and editing of video performance.
Within the festival Tanztage the work was a performance by Judith Förster and Nanna Stigsdatter





“This cinematic avatar of Judith Förster’s performance showdown extends the format of screen dance and dance documentary film as an audiovisual work. In search of the different ways of relating text and moving images to each other, showdown AV offers non-didactic insights into the narrative worlds and research that have accompanied the performance’s development process. Through a sensitive cut in sound and video as well as intimate close-ups, the film invites the audience to follow their own associations or to let themselves fall into the images of the film.” Tanztage Berlin











paragliding /

 knotting / 
                                   masking /
              waterfall /












“Do you remember those motionless moments in film where everyone points a weapon at each other ready to shoot? The only way to get out of this situation without the risk of being killed is a slow and careful withdrawal, like slowly getting the air out of a balloon, very slowly.” - film quote

































Video Installation
A two-folded work of Live video and a VR installation in collaboration with choreographer Anna Nowicka.

this is the real thing (VR)




this is the real thing (VR) 


Video Installation
A two-folded work of Live video and a VR installation in collaboration with choreographer Anna Nowicka.
Documentation: Piotr Petrus



 


















︎︎︎ Try the 360º video    ︎︎︎ Try the 360º video    ︎︎︎ Try the 360º video    ︎︎︎ Try the 360º video































“In collaboration with filmmaker Stella Horta, Anna is moving away from capturing or shooting an image towards the possible tenderness of imaging and being present as a performer and observer”.














“In collaboration with filmmaker Stella Horta, Anna is moving away from capturing or shooting an image towards the possible tenderness of imaging and being present as a performer and observer”.









“In the synchronicity of seeing and being seen, of what is tangible and imagined, a third, shared space unravels, where these dichotomies fall open. The audience is invited to experience the virtual reality films by Anna Nowicka and Stella Horta via VR glasses prior to the performances.”



















































“In the synchronicity of seeing and being seen, of what is tangible and imagined, a third, shared space unravels, where these dichotomies fall open. The audience is invited to experience the virtual reality films by Anna Nowicka and Stella Horta via VR glasses prior to the performances.”


















Video Installation
Video installation in collaboration with Cranky Bodies A/Company.

terrestrial transit









In the form of a choreographic journey outside of representational theater spaces, the interdisciplinary project Terrestrial Transit questions the critical potential of improvisational practice.

In light of the strengthening of right-wing authoritarian politics and against the backdrop of political protests, especially in Hungary and Poland, the ensemble explores alternative modes of participation and collaboration, exchange, and storytelling.







“The evenings at DOCK 11 mark the end of their journey, which began in the Sophiensaele, continuing via the Brandenburg residence Ponderosa and Szczecin to the Polish Baltic Sea, and was accompanied by the filmmaker Stella Horta. In an installative and durational setting, dance improvisation, video, sound, autobiographical memories, and historical events flow into each other, opening up questions about the potential of improvisational practice, participation, and resistance.”
























terrestrial transit



Video Installation Video installation in collaboration with Cranky Bodies A/Company.







In the form of a choreographic journey outside of representational theater spaces, the interdisciplinary project Terrestrial Transit questions the critical potential of improvisational practice.